Residential Conversions & New Buildings

tribeca

Duane Street Façade
Hudson Street Façade

The Mohawk Atelier

36 Hudson Street/161 Duane Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors with a restaurant on the first floor and cellar of two store and loft buildings totaling 35,000sf in the TriBeCa West Historic District..

The complex consists of two historically significant buildings. 36 Hudson was designed by Babcock & Morgan, Architects, in a Romanesque Revival Style and constructed in 1891 with a brick and red sandstone facade with cast iron infill bays at the first floor. 161 Duane Street was constructed in 1844 as a dwelling with a brick facade with stone sills and heads. It was subsequently used as a whale bone cutting establishment.

The buildings were combined and a single elevator and egress core installed. The exteriors of the buildings were conserved.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

ice house from the south
ice house from the north
the atalanta & the ice house from the north

The Ice House

27 North Moore Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to 58 residential lofts and 3 stores of a 10 story, 160,000sf refrigeration building in the TriBeCa West Historic District.

Designed by William H. Birkmire, Architect in a Romanesque Style and built in 1905 with a brick and terra cotta facade with blind windows.

The Ice House was part of a complex of refrigeration buildings used by the dairy business in association with the nearby Washington Market. With the relocation of the Market and freon becoming illegal, the building became redundant.

A ten story interior court was created to bring light and air to the center of the building. The 15,000sf removed floor area was relocated to the roof to create two story penthouses with two-story high living rooms.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Planning Commission approval.

artist rendering

Atalanta Building

25 North Moore Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to 35 residential lofts and 3 stores of a 16 story, 115,000sf refrigeration building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. Designed by John B. Snook Sons, Architects in an Industrial Style and constructed in 1924 for the Merchants’ Refrigerating Company in reinforced concrete.

Atalanta was windowless on the fourth to fourteenth floors and was part of a complex of refrigeration buildings for the dairy business as part of the nearby Washington Market. With the relocation of the Market and freon becoming illegal, the building became redundant.

New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Planning Commission approval.

the juilliard building

The Juilliard Building

14-22 Leonard Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of three seven-story and two six-story loft buildings totaling 78,000sf in the TriBeCa West Historic District.

The seven story buildings at 14, 16 & 18 Leonard Street were designed by J. Morgan Slade, Architect, for Helen C. Juilliard a member of the prominent Augustus D. Juilliard Dry-Goods firm and constructed in 1881 with a brick facade and a stone and cast iron store base.

The six story building at 20 Leonard Street was designed by J.S. Purdy, Architect, and constructed in 1874 with a brick facade and a stone base.

The six story building at 22 Leonard Street was designed by Joseph Naylor, Architect, and constructed in 1873 with a brick facade and a stone base.

The buildings were combined, two elevator egress cores installed, the exteriors conserved and the interiors converted to 30 residential lofts, including the addition of set-back two-story penthouses.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

5 Worth Street

5 Worth Street

TriBeCa, New York

Conversion to residential lofts of a 5 story, 15,000sf, loft building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. Designed by Samual A. Warner, Architect, in a Queen Ann Style and constructed in 1887 with a brick, trimmed in stone, and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

Comet Warehouse

Comet Warehouse

6 Varick Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of the Comet Warehouse Building, a 10 story, 50,000sf, store and loft building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. Designed by George W. DaCunha, Architect in a Neo-Grec/Queen Anne Style and constructed in 1881 with a brick facade with cast iron columns.

United States Sugar Building

United States Sugar Building

79 Laight Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a ten-story. 110,000sf warehouse building in the TriBeCa North Historic District.
Constructed in 1853, in a Utilitarian Style United States Sugar Building represents the 19th century legacy of New York City’s sugar industry. The building was used as a warehouse for sugar in conjunction with a sugar refinery immediately to the north. Conservation of the exterior and renovation of the interior including installation of set-back penthouse additions. An entirely new structural system was installed. Many of the units having two-stories spaces in the front and split level bedroom areas behind.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

skylofts

Skylofts

145 Hudson Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 14 story, 150,000sf store and factory building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. Designed by Renwick, Aspinwall & Guard in a Industrial Aesthetic Style with Art Deco elements and constructed in 1929 with a cast stone and brick façade with steel industrial sashes.

The exterior was conserved and the interiors converted to residential lofts, including the addition of a set-back penthouse in the form of a large skylight as originally intended by Renwick, Aspinwall & Guard (the penthouse was subsequently replaced by an all glass penthouse).

7 Hubert Street

7 Hubert Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Creation of a contextual 96,000sf, fourteen-story residential building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. The first tall building in the TriBeCa Historic District to be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and Board of Standards & Appeals approval. After approvals were obtained, the project was sold to a developer with another architect.

Glass Atelier

The Glass Atelier

401-3 Greenwich Street, TriBeCa

The Glass Atelier has a glass facade made of clear glass bricks laid in a running bond with carved glass columns, capitals and details. The transparent design is in the Romanesque vocabulary of TriBeCa with arched lintels, columns with capitals and plinths, setback windows demonstrating wall depth and a corbelled cornice all executed in glass.

The six story building would have contained 2 retail stores and 8 residential lofts with obscure glass partitions.

The Glass Atelier was to be in the tradition of buildings found in the TriBeCa West Historic District interpreted as the transparent facade of the last several decades.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

117 Hudson Street

117 Hudson Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six-story, 37,500sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa West Historic District including the addition of a set-back penthouse. Designed by Thomas R. Jackson, Architect, in a Romanesque Revival Style and constructed in 1888 with a masonry and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

414 Washington Street

Pearline Soap Atelier

414 Washington Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Creation of two contextual seven-story neo-Romanesque Style residential loft buildings in the TriBeCa North Historic District. 414 Washington Street is 25,000sf and 415 Washington is 55,000sf. In the character of the TriBeCa North Historic District, 414 Washington Street and 415 Washington Street have distinct traditional brick construction in a utilitarian, rational design containing:

Tripartite facades composed of red brick arches clearly expressing the structure with the substantial depth of masonry fully apparent.

Flat openings with a slight camber at the first floor, segmentally-arched openings at the middle floors, and round-arched openings at the top floor.

Raised platforms with glass lenses distinguishing the base and facades, terminating in simple corbelled brick cornices.

Canopies and utilitarian lighting marking the entrances and granite sidewalks.

Fairchild & Foster Atelier

Fairchild & Foster Atelier

415 Washington Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

The two buildings are being constructed as one project. On opposite sides of the street and oriented in opposite directions, their juxtaposition creates a spatial relationship.

The buildings do not pretend to be warehouse buildings converted to human occupancy; they look to the District buildings through contextual materials, details, height, color, geometry, and bay width. The size of the openings and the clarity and directness of the design speaks to the 21st century.

Landmark Preservation Commission approval.

The Grabler Building

The Grabler Building

44 Laight Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of an 8 story, 75,000sf, loft building in the TriBeCa North Historic District. Designed by Clinton & Russell, Architects, in a Renaissance revival Style and constructed in 1896 with a brown brick and cast iron facade. Conservation of the exterior and renovation of the interior including the addition of a setback penthouse and a garage.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

76 Laight Street

76 Laight Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a 10 story, 30,000sf, loft building in the TriBeCa North Historic District. Designed by Thomas R. Jackson, Architect in a Romanesque Style, and constructed in 1899 with a red brick facade with masonry detailing.

Board of Standards and Appeals and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

472 Greenwich Street

472 Greenwich Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six story, 12,000sf, store and loft building in the TriBeCa North Historic District.

75 Leonard Street

75 Leonard Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five-story, 24,000sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa East Historic District. Designed in an Italianate Style and constructed in 1865 with a masonry and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

146 Duane St
The Clock at 146 Duane

146 Duane Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five-story, 21,000sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa South Historic District. Designed in an Italianate Style and constructed in 1859 with a marble facade and a cast iron storefront base. In 1940, a handsome clock was installed at the second floor by Nathaniel Fisher & Co., a shoe & boot maker and tenant from the 1890s to the 1950s.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

45-7 Warren Street

45-7 Warren Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of two five-story, store and loft buildings in the TriBeCa South Historic District totaling 23,500sf. Designed in an Italianate Style and constructed in 1854 with a marble facade above a cast iron base.

Board of Standards & Appeals approval.

54-6 White Street

54-6 White Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 6 story, 25,000sf, store and loft building in the TriBeCa East Historic District. Designed by Benjamin W. Walker, Architect, in an Italianate Style and constructed in in 1866 with a sandstone facade and a cast iron storefront.

58 Walker Street

58 Walker Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five-story, 14,000sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa East Historic District including the addition of a set-back penthouse. Designed by Benjamin W. Warner, Architect, in a Second Empire Style and constructed in 1869 with a marble facade above a cast iron base of engaged columns.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

405 Broadway

405 Broadway

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 5 story, 16,000sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa East Historic District. Constructed in 1853, it was altered by Clarence L. Sefert, Architect in an Early Twentieth Century Commercial Style in 1908 with a brick and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

121 Chambers Street / 103 Reade Street

121 Chambers Street / 103 Reade Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential use and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval for the conservation and restoration of the exterior including the addition of a penthouse for a five story through-the block loft building in the TriBeCa Historic District.

121 Chambers Street/103 Reade Street, TriBeCa, was constructed in an Italianate Style in 1860 for Frederick E. Gibert, Ship Chandler. The Chambers Street and Reade Street facades are faced in sandstone above the first story. Surviving at the first story on the Reade Street side is the original cast-iron storefront which is listed in D.D. Badger’s 1865 catalog of the Architectural Iron Works of New York.