Residential Conversions & New Buildings

financial district

liberty tower
1910 postcard

Liberty Tower

55 Liberty Street, Manhattan

Conversion to residential use of a 33 story, 175,000sf store and office building in the Financial District. Designed by Henry Ives Cobb, Architect in a neo-Gothic Style and constructed with a terra-cotta and stone facade in 1909. Liberty Tower is one of the early romantic skyscrapers which changed the skyline of lower Manhattan.

In 1978, the conversion of Liberty Tower introduced residential use to the Financial District. Joseph Pell Lombardi, as both architect and investor, conserved the exterior, designed the interiors, reinstated missing historic elements, and converted the building into 89 residential units on the upper floors and retail stores on the first floor, mezzanine and cellar.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and Board of Standards & Appeals approval.

9-15 murray street

9-15 Murray Street

Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a 12 story 110,000sf, store and office building. Constructed in the early 20th century with a limestone and brick facade in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.

City Planning Commission approval.

broad exchange building

Broad Exchange Building

25 Broad Street, Manhattan

Preparation of a National Register Nomination and obtaining an Historic Investment Tax Credit for a 500,000sf 21 story skyscraper in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.

Designed by Clinton & Russell, Architects, in an Italian Renaissnace Palazzo Style and constructed with a granite, brick and terra-cotta facade in 1899.

165 william street

165 William Street

Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 10 story, 65,000sf, store and loft building building in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan.

City Planning Commission approval.

64-68 fulton street

64-68 Fulton Street

Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of an 11 story, 40,000sf store and loft building in the Seaport Financial District.

seaport

29-33 Peck Slip / 240-242 Front Street

29-33 Peck Slip / 240-242 Front Street

Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of five 5-story, store and loft buildings in the Seaport Historic District totaling 40,000sf. The five buildings were built in a Utilitarian Federal Style and have later nineteenth century cast iron and granite storefronts columns. 29 and 31 Peck Slip were built in 1836, 33 Peck Slip were constructed in 1856, 240 Front Street was constructed in 1851 and 242 Front Street were constructed in 1853 with a masonry and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

  • early view

tribeca

Duane Street Façade
Hudson Street Façade

The Mohawk Atelier

36 Hudson Street/161 Duane Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors with a restaurant on the first floor and cellar of two store and loft buildings totaling 35,000sf in the TriBeCa West Historic District..

The complex consists of two historically significant buildings. 36 Hudson was designed by Babcock & Morgan, Architects, in a Romanesque Revival Style and constructed in 1891 with a brick and red sandstone facade with cast iron infill bays at the first floor. 161 Duane Street was constructed in 1844 as a dwelling with a brick facade with stone sills and heads. It was subsequently used as a whale bone cutting establishment.

The buildings were combined and a single elevator and egress core installed. The exteriors of the buildings were conserved.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

ice house from the south
ice house from the north
the atalanta & the ice house from the north

The Ice House

27 North Moore Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to 58 residential lofts and 3 stores of a 10 story, 160,000sf refrigeration building in the TriBeCa West Historic District.

Designed by William H. Birkmire, Architect in a Romanesque Style and built in 1905 with a brick and terra cotta facade with blind windows.

The Ice House was part of a complex of refrigeration buildings used by the dairy business in association with the nearby Washington Market. With the relocation of the Market and freon becoming illegal, the building became redundant.

A ten story interior court was created to bring light and air to the center of the building. The 15,000sf removed floor area was relocated to the roof to create two story penthouses with two-story high living rooms.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Planning Commission approval.

artist rendering

Atalanta Building

25 North Moore Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to 35 residential lofts and 3 stores of a 16 story, 115,000sf refrigeration building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. Designed by John B. Snook Sons, Architects in an Industrial Style and constructed in 1924 for the Merchants’ Refrigerating Company in reinforced concrete.

Atalanta was windowless on the fourth to fourteenth floors and was part of a complex of refrigeration buildings for the dairy business as part of the nearby Washington Market. With the relocation of the Market and freon becoming illegal, the building became redundant.

New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Planning Commission approval.

the juilliard building

The Juilliard Building

14-22 Leonard Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of three seven-story and two six-story loft buildings totaling 78,000sf in the TriBeCa West Historic District.

The seven story buildings at 14, 16 & 18 Leonard Street were designed by J. Morgan Slade, Architect, for Helen C. Juilliard a member of the prominent Augustus D. Juilliard Dry-Goods firm and constructed in 1881 with a brick facade and a stone and cast iron store base.

The six story building at 20 Leonard Street was designed by J.S. Purdy, Architect, and constructed in 1874 with a brick facade and a stone base.

The six story building at 22 Leonard Street was designed by Joseph Naylor, Architect, and constructed in 1873 with a brick facade and a stone base.

The buildings were combined, two elevator egress cores installed, the exteriors conserved and the interiors converted to 30 residential lofts, including the addition of set-back two-story penthouses.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

5 Worth Street

5 Worth Street

TriBeCa, New York

Conversion to residential lofts of a 5 story, 15,000sf, loft building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. Designed by Samual A. Warner, Architect, in a Queen Ann Style and constructed in 1887 with a brick, trimmed in stone, and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

Comet Warehouse

Comet Warehouse

6 Varick Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of the Comet Warehouse Building, a 10 story, 50,000sf, store and loft building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. Designed by George W. DaCunha, Architect in a Neo-Grec/Queen Anne Style and constructed in 1881 with a brick facade with cast iron columns.

United States Sugar Building

United States Sugar Building

79 Laight Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a ten-story. 110,000sf warehouse building in the TriBeCa North Historic District.
Constructed in 1853, in a Utilitarian Style United States Sugar Building represents the 19th century legacy of New York City’s sugar industry. The building was used as a warehouse for sugar in conjunction with a sugar refinery immediately to the north. Conservation of the exterior and renovation of the interior including installation of set-back penthouse additions. An entirely new structural system was installed. Many of the units having two-stories spaces in the front and split level bedroom areas behind.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

skylofts

Skylofts

145 Hudson Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 14 story, 150,000sf store and factory building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. Designed by Renwick, Aspinwall & Guard in a Industrial Aesthetic Style with Art Deco elements and constructed in 1929 with a cast stone and brick façade with steel industrial sashes.

The exterior was conserved and the interiors converted to residential lofts, including the addition of a set-back penthouse in the form of a large skylight as originally intended by Renwick, Aspinwall & Guard (the penthouse was subsequently replaced by an all glass penthouse).

7 Hubert Street

7 Hubert Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Creation of a contextual 96,000sf, fourteen-story residential building in the TriBeCa West Historic District. The first tall building in the TriBeCa Historic District to be approved by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and Board of Standards & Appeals approval. After approvals were obtained, the project was sold to a developer with another architect.

Glass Atelier

The Glass Atelier

401-3 Greenwich Street, TriBeCa

The Glass Atelier has a glass facade made of clear glass bricks laid in a running bond with carved glass columns, capitals and details. The transparent design is in the Romanesque vocabulary of TriBeCa with arched lintels, columns with capitals and plinths, setback windows demonstrating wall depth and a corbelled cornice all executed in glass.

The six story building would have contained 2 retail stores and 8 residential lofts with obscure glass partitions.

The Glass Atelier was to be in the tradition of buildings found in the TriBeCa West Historic District interpreted as the transparent facade of the last several decades.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

117 Hudson Street

117 Hudson Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six-story, 37,500sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa West Historic District including the addition of a set-back penthouse. Designed by Thomas R. Jackson, Architect, in a Romanesque Revival Style and constructed in 1888 with a masonry and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

414 Washington Street

Pearline Soap Atelier

414 Washington Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Creation of two contextual seven-story neo-Romanesque Style residential loft buildings in the TriBeCa North Historic District. 414 Washington Street is 25,000sf and 415 Washington is 55,000sf. In the character of the TriBeCa North Historic District, 414 Washington Street and 415 Washington Street have distinct traditional brick construction in a utilitarian, rational design containing:

Tripartite facades composed of red brick arches clearly expressing the structure with the substantial depth of masonry fully apparent.

Flat openings with a slight camber at the first floor, segmentally-arched openings at the middle floors, and round-arched openings at the top floor.

Raised platforms with glass lenses distinguishing the base and facades, terminating in simple corbelled brick cornices.

Canopies and utilitarian lighting marking the entrances and granite sidewalks.

Fairchild & Foster Atelier

Fairchild & Foster Atelier

415 Washington Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

The two buildings are being constructed as one project. On opposite sides of the street and oriented in opposite directions, their juxtaposition creates a spatial relationship.

The buildings do not pretend to be warehouse buildings converted to human occupancy; they look to the District buildings through contextual materials, details, height, color, geometry, and bay width. The size of the openings and the clarity and directness of the design speaks to the 21st century.

Landmark Preservation Commission approval.

The Grabler Building

The Grabler Building

44 Laight Street, TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of an 8 story, 75,000sf, loft building in the TriBeCa North Historic District. Designed by Clinton & Russell, Architects, in a Renaissance revival Style and constructed in 1896 with a brown brick and cast iron facade. Conservation of the exterior and renovation of the interior including the addition of a setback penthouse and a garage.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

76 Laight Street

76 Laight Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a 10 story, 30,000sf, loft building in the TriBeCa North Historic District. Designed by Thomas R. Jackson, Architect in a Romanesque Style, and constructed in 1899 with a red brick facade with masonry detailing.

Board of Standards and Appeals and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

472 Greenwich Street

472 Greenwich Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six story, 12,000sf, store and loft building in the TriBeCa North Historic District.

75 Leonard Street

75 Leonard Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five-story, 24,000sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa East Historic District. Designed in an Italianate Style and constructed in 1865 with a masonry and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

146 Duane St
The Clock at 146 Duane

146 Duane Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five-story, 21,000sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa South Historic District. Designed in an Italianate Style and constructed in 1859 with a marble facade and a cast iron storefront base. In 1940, a handsome clock was installed at the second floor by Nathaniel Fisher & Co., a shoe & boot maker and tenant from the 1890s to the 1950s.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

45-7 Warren Street

45-7 Warren Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of two five-story, store and loft buildings in the TriBeCa South Historic District totaling 23,500sf. Designed in an Italianate Style and constructed in 1854 with a marble facade above a cast iron base.

Board of Standards & Appeals approval.

54-6 White Street

54-6 White Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 6 story, 25,000sf, store and loft building in the TriBeCa East Historic District. Designed by Benjamin W. Walker, Architect, in an Italianate Style and constructed in in 1866 with a sandstone facade and a cast iron storefront.

58 Walker Street

58 Walker Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five-story, 14,000sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa East Historic District including the addition of a set-back penthouse. Designed by Benjamin W. Warner, Architect, in a Second Empire Style and constructed in 1869 with a marble facade above a cast iron base of engaged columns.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

405 Broadway

405 Broadway

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 5 story, 16,000sf store and loft building in the TriBeCa East Historic District. Constructed in 1853, it was altered by Clarence L. Sefert, Architect in an Early Twentieth Century Commercial Style in 1908 with a brick and cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

121 Chambers Street / 103 Reade Street

121 Chambers Street / 103 Reade Street

TriBeCa, Manhattan

Conversion to residential use and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval for the conservation and restoration of the exterior including the addition of a penthouse for a five story through-the block loft building in the TriBeCa Historic District.

121 Chambers Street/103 Reade Street, TriBeCa, was constructed in an Italianate Style in 1860 for Frederick E. Gibert, Ship Chandler. The Chambers Street and Reade Street facades are faced in sandstone above the first story. Surviving at the first story on the Reade Street side is the original cast-iron storefront which is listed in D.D. Badger’s 1865 catalog of the Architectural Iron Works of New York.

soho

69 Greene St

69 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Built in 1876, the cast iron façade is being conserved.

73 Greene Street

73 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Built in 1876, the cast iron façade is being conserved

70 Greene Street

70 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Built in 1860, the masonry and cast iron façade is being conserved and four residential units are being created including a penthouse with a mezzanine.

Approval of the Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission.

Greene Street facade

92-94 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

A new contextual residential loft building in SoHo.
92-94 Greene Street was to be a new building that integrated into the historic fabric of SoHo. The building was to run through the block with facades on Greene Street and Mercer Street. The façades were designed in pressed enameled steel reflecting the technology of the 20th century in a 19th century context.

The units were designed to have high-ceilinged living rooms facing the street and split level bedrooms with mezzanines in the court between Greene Street and Mercer Street.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

  • mercer facade
96 & 98 Greene Street

96 & 98 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of two five-story, store and loft buildings totaling 24,000sf in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

96 Greene Street was designed by Henry Fernbach, Architect, in a Classical Style and constructed in 1880 with a cast iron facade.

98 Greene Street was designed by Charles Mettam, Architect, in a Classical Style with neo-Grec details and constructed in 1879 with a cast iron facade. It is identical to 102 Greene Street (see below).

The buildings were combined, a new elevator and egress core installed, the exteriors conserved and the interiors converted to 10 residential lofts, including the addition of set-back one-story penthouses.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

102 Greene Street

102 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Reconstruction of an 1880 cast iron as originally designed by Henry Fernbach, Architect in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Conservation of the cast iron exterior of the building. The fourth and fifth floors are being added back based upon historic photographs and a twin building at 96-98 Greene Street. Five residential lofts are being created including a two-story penthouse addition on the roof.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

101-5 Greene Street Facade
101-5 Greene Street

101-5 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

At 101 Greene Street, reconstruction on the original foundations of a five-story building with residential lofts on the upper floors and stores on the first floor, At 103-5 Greene Street the conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five-story, store and loft building. Totaling 30,000sf, both buildings are in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District

The two identical five-story buildings at 101-5 Greene Street were designed by Henry Fernbach, Architect and constructed in 1879 with a cast iron store facade. 101 Greene Street was substantially demolished in 1957.

The buildings were combined, an elevator egress core installed, the exteriors conserved/reconstructed and the interiors converted to 10 residential lofts, including the addition of set-back two-story penthouses.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

107-111 Greene Street Facade
107-111 Greene Street
facade Detail

107-111 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Creation of three new seven-story contextual residential loft and store buildings totaling 45,000sf on the original foundations of three buildings substantially demolished in 1923. The three buildings are in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

The design evokes the scale, materials, spacing and rhythm of the Historic District. The façade has exposed riveted steel members which recall the off-site fabricated capitals and bases of its cast iron neighbors. The buildings speak to the progression of off-site pre-fabrication from cast iron facades in the 19th century to riveted steel construction of the 20th century.

The buildings were combined, two elevator egress cores installed, and the interiors designed as 15 residential lofts, including the addition of set-back two-story penthouses.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

Greene Street Facade
Mercer Street Facade

110 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential/office/store use of a 12 story, 175,000sf, building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District including a new penthouse. Designed by William J. Dilthey, Architect, and constructed in 1908 for Charles Broadway
Rouse, a prominent nineteenth century merchant, and owner of another large loft building at 555 Broadway.

110 Greene Street goes through the block with frontage on Mercer Street.
Landmarks Preservation Commission, Board of Standards & Appeals and City

Planning Commission approval.

114 Greene Street

114 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 6 story 30,000sf building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Designed by Henry Fernbach, Architect, in a Classical Style and constructed in 1881 with a cast iron facade.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

116-18 Greene Street Facade
Prince Street Facade

116-18 Greene Street/102 Prince Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six story, 40,000sf, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Designed by Henry Fernbach, Architect, in a Classical Style and constructed in 1881 with a cast iron facade.

The building also has frontage on Prince Street.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

  • 1970s View - Photo by Gil Amiaga
121 Greene Street

121 Greene Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six story, 35,000sf, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Designed by Henry Fernbach, Architect, in a Classical Style with neo-Grec motifs and constructed in 1883 with a cast iron facade.

Conservation of the exterior and the addition of a set back penthouse addition.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

The A.J. Ditenhoefer Building

The A.J. Ditenhoefer Building

427 Broadway, SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six-story, 25,000sf, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Designed by Thomas Jackson in a Venetian Renaissance style with French Renaissance detailing and constructed in 1870 with a cast iron facade. With magnificent facades on both Broadway and Howard Street, the A. J. Dittenhoefer Building is one of the most distinguished cast iron buildings in the world.

early view

The Suspenders Building

428 Broadway, Soho, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six-story, 42,000sf, loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Designed by Samuel A. Warner, Architect in a Queen Ann Style and constructed in 1888 with a brick, terra-cotta and sandstone facade.

The D. Devlin Building

The D. Devlin Building

459 Broadway, SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five-story, 27,000sf, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. with facades on both Broadway and Grand Street. Constructed in 1861 with a stone facade.
Conservation of the exterior, including the replacement of the existing compromising aluminum storefront which was concealing the original arched arcade. Restoration of the cast iron and wood infill and reinstatement of the original vault lights.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

  • facade drawing
472 Broadway

472 Broadway

SoHo, Manhattan

Design of a new six story 10,000sf store and residential loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron District recreating the original cast iron building as designed by William H. Cauvet in 1878.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

The Loft

The Loft

30 Crosby Street, SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a five-story, 60,000sf, factory building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Designed by William Cauvet, Architect, in a Utilitarian Style and constructed in 1878 with a brick and stone facade. Used as a corset factory, the building was joined to 472 Broadway (see above) with the Broadway building being used as a store to sell the goods. Conservation of the exterior of the and renovation of the interior including two-story penthouse addition.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

473 Broadway

473 Broadway

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of an eight story, 40,000sf store and loft building in the SoHo District. Designed by Ralph Townsend, Architect and constructed in 1894 with a limestone facade as a textile and rug showroom building with M. Hohner, the noted harmonica manufacturer, on the sixth floor.

The exterior was conserved and the interior converted to 30 residential lofts, including the addition of set-back penthouses.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

Ball, Black & Co. Building

Ball, Black & Co. Building

565 Broadway, SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of the Ball, Black & Company Building, a nine story, 45,000sf, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. It was designed by John Kellum, Architect, in a classical Palazzo Style and constructed in 1859 with an Eastchester marble and iron facade.

The building was leased to Ball, Black & Company, a prominent 19th century jeweler; they used the first three stories for sale and showrooms and the remainder for manufacturing.

The building was raised to nine stories in 1893 with a cream colored brick facade with window trim in imitation of the original building. (Image shows the original five story building).

Landmarks Preservation Commission and Board of Standards & Appeals approval.

  • Early 20th Century View
  • 1970s view
5-7 Mercer Street

5-7 Mercer Street

SoHo, New York

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Designed by J.B. Snook, Architect in a Classical Style and constructed in 1861 with a cast iron and stone facade.

The cast iron exterior of the building is being conserved including reestablishing the missing elements based upon historic photographs.

448 Broome Street

448 Broome Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a five story, 7,000sf, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Designed by the noted 19th century architect, Calvert Vaux in a Classical Style with forms derived from French Renaissance sources and constructed in 1871 with a cast iron facade.

City Planning Commission and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

450 Broome Street

450 Broome Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a nine story, 25,000sf, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. It was designed by John T. Williams, Architect in a Classical Style and constructed in 1894 with an Indiana limestone, iron, brick and terra-cotta facade.

Board of Standards & Appeals, City Planning Commission and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

  • 1970s View
461-463 Broome Street

461-463 Broome Street

SoHo Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of two five story, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District totaling 50,000sf. 461 Broome Street was designed by Griffith Thomas, Architect in a Classical Style and constructed in 1871 with a cast iron facade. 463 Broome Street was designed by Henry Fernbach, Architect in a Classical Style and constructed in 1867 with a cast iron facade.

City Planning Commission and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

109 Spring Street/107 Mercer Street

109 Spring Street/107 Mercer Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five story, 30,000sf store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Designed by J.B. Snook, Architect, in a Classical Style and constructed in 1878 with brick facades and cast iron storefronts

Landmarks Preservation Commission, Board of Standards & Appeals and City Planning Commission approvals.

149 Spring Street

149 Spring Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of an eight story, 19,000sf store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Designed by G.F. Pelham, Architect, in a Classical Style and constructed in 1897 with a brick and terra-cotta facade and a cast iron storefront.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

152 Spring Street

152 Spring Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a Federal Style store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Constructed in 1810 as a residence with a brick facade and an iron and wood storefront.

154 Spring Street

154 Spring Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of an five story, store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Designed by Louis Sheinart, Architect and constructed in 1911 with a brick and terra-cotta facade.

83 Mercer Street

83 Mercer Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conservation of the exterior, the addition of a set-back rooftop penthouse and conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five story, 12,500sf store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Designed by J.B. Snook, Architect, in a Classical Style and constructed in 1872 with a cast iron facade and storefront.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

Herter Brothers Building

Herter Brothers Building

131 Mercer Street, SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a six story, 29,000sf store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District. Constructed in 1869 with a brick and stone facade and a cast iron storefront for Gustave Herter, later Herter Brothers, the prominent 19th century furniture maker and decorating firm.

Landmarks Preservation Commission, Board of Standards & Appeals and City Planning Commission approval.

  • 1970s View
155 Wooster Street

155 Wooster Street

SoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of an eight-story 41,000sf store and loft building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

Designed by George F. Pelham, Architect, and constructed in 1897 with a brick, stone, cast iron and terra-cotta facade.

Conservation of the exterior and a penthouse addition on the roof.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

430-4 W. Broadway

430-4 W Broadway

SoHo, Manhattan

Design of a new store and office building in the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District.

noho

37 Great Jones Street

37 Great Jones Street

NoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a five story, 13,000sf factory & garage building in the NoHo Historic District. Designed by Lewis C. Patton, Architect in a Utilitarian Style and constructed in 1917 with a brick facade.

Conservation of the exterior and conversion of the interior to five residential lofts, including the addition of a set-back penthouse.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission procedures.

  • 1936 view
Empire State Bank Building

Empire State Bank Building

640 Broadway, NoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of The Empire State Bank Building, a nine story, 45,000sf store and loft building in the NoHo Historic District. Designed by DeLemos & Cordes, Architects in a Classical Revival Style and constructed in 1896 with brick facing and stone and terra-cotta ornament.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

W. & J. Sloane Building © Suzanne Opton

W. & J. Sloane Building

649 Broadway, NoHo, Manhattan

Prepared for conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five story, 100,000sf store and factory building in the NoHo Historic District. Designed by Griffith Thomas in a Italianate Commercial Palace Style and constructed in 1871 with a marble façade for the prominent W. & J. Sloane Department Store.

On Valentine’s Day in 1979, a substantial fire occurred in the building which burned for over a week, leaving only the shell of building. The facade was on the verge of being demolished by New York City because it was in an unstable condition. An injunction was sought at the New York State Court and time was granted to stabilize the facade, even though Broadway had to remain closed to traffic.

  • 19th Century Image
  • 1970s View -19th Century Image © NY Public Library
Manhattan Savings Building

Manhattan Savings Building

644 Broadway, NoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of the Manhattan Savings Buuilding, an eight story, 60,000sf, store and loft building in the NoHo Historic District. Designed by Stephen D. Hatch, Architect in a Queen Anne/Romanesque Revival Style and constructed in 1889 with a brick and red sandstone facade.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

  • 1970s View
652 Broadway

652 Broadway

NoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a 12 story, 50,000sf store and loft building in the NoHo Historic District. Designed by Frederick C. Browne, Architect in a Neo-Classical Style and constructed in 1906 with a limestone, brick and terra-cotta facade.

Board of Standards and Appeals and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

684 Broadway

684 Broadway

NoHo, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a 12 story, 65,000sf store and loft building in the NoHo Historic District. Designed by Frederick C. Browne, Architect in a Renaissance Revival Style and constructed in 1905 with a limestone, brick and terra-cotta facade.

Board of Standards and Appeals and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

greenwich village & lower east side

59 Fourth Avenue

59 Fourth Avenue

Greenwich Village, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of an eight story, 30,000sf store and loft building in Greenwich Village.

  • 1970s View
Edath Lei'Israel Anshei Meseritz Synagogue

Edath Lei'Israel Anshei Meseritz Synagogue

415 East 6th Street, Manhatttan

Edath Lei’Israel Anshei Meseritz Shul is a 1910 Orthodox synagogue on New York City’s Lower East Side. Built by a congregation established in 1892 consisting of immigrants from Meseritz, Poland, the synagogue has an Italian neo-Renaissance facade designed by Herman Horenburger and executed in limestone. At 22′ wide, the facade is narrow, yet sophisticated, very much in the genre of the “Tenament Synagogues” – narrow synagogues built on the 25′ wide lots of the Lower East Side at the turn of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries.

Now located in the East Village/Lower East Side Historic District, the work consists of the conservation of the exterior, including the stained glass windows, and the adaption of the upper floors as residences with the synagogue remaining on the first floor.

85 Attorney Street

85 Attorney Street

Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a five story, 10,000sf factory building in the Lower East Side. Constructed in 1910 with a brick facade in a Utilitarian Style.

flatiron / ladies’ mile district

874 Broadway

Macintyre Building

874 Broadway, Flatiron/Ladies' Mile District, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of The MacIntyre Building, an 11 story, 44,000sf store and loft building in the Flatiron/Ladies’ Mile Historic District. Designed by Robert Henderson Robertson, Architect in a Romanesque Revival Style and constructed in 1890 with a limestone, brick and terra-cotta facade. The ornamentation is derived from Byzantine, Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque sources. After its construction, it was known as a building which “every New Yorker knows by sight”.

Board of Standards and Appeals and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

  • 1898 Floor Plan
889 Broadway

Gorham Building

889 Broadway, Flatiron/Ladies' Mile District, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of The Gorham Building, an eight story, 40,000sf store and loft building in the Flatiron/Ladies’ Mile Historic District. Designed by Edward Halle Kendall, Architect, in a Queen Anne Style and constructed in 1883 with a pink brick and terra-cotta facade with Belleville sandstone trim and a high pitched slate roof accented by iron cresting. Constructed for the noted New York Goelet family, it was initially built as bachelor apartments on the upper floors with the prestigious Gorham Silver Company on the first two floors.

Board of Standards and Appeals, City Planning Commission and Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

West 18th Street Facade

40 West 18th Street

Ladies' Mile/Flatiron District, Manhattan

Design of a new 140,000sf building with 62 units which integrates into the historic fabric of the District.

Although contextual, the design uses distinct details and materials to create a 21st century building. The building runs through the block with towers on West 18th Street and West 17th Street. The project includes the conservation of two historic buildings on West 18th Street.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and the City Planning Commission approval.

The 17th Street facade and an earlier design, “The Ruined Column,” is shown below.

Kensington Building

Kensington Building

73 Fifth Avenue Ladies' Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of the Kensington Building, an eleven story, 70,000sf store and loft building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District. Designed by Samuel Sass, Architect, in a Beaux-Arts style and constructed in 1906 with a stone and brick facade.

Corn Exchange Bank Building - Image by: Gilbert Ortiz

Corn Exchange Bank Building

140 Fifth Avenue, Ladies' Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of the Corn Exchange Bank Building, a 13 story, 65,000sf store and loft building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District. Designed by Robert Maynicke, Architect in a neo-Renaissance style and constructed in 1899 with a limestone facade.

210 Fifth Avenue

210 Fifth Avenue

Madison Square North, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of an 11 story, 55,000sf, store and loft building in the Madison Square North Historic District. Designed by John B. Snook, Architect in a Beaux Arts Style and constructed in 1901 with a marble, cast iron, brick and terra-cotta facade.

The Decker Building - Image: © The New York Public Library

The Decker Building

33 Union Square West, Union Square, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of an 11 story, 55,000sf, store and office building overlooking Union Square. Designed by John Edelmann, Architect, in a Islamic/Venetian Style and constructed in 1893 with a masonry and brick facade with a tile roof. The building originally had a minaret.

Landmarks Preservation Commission approval.

9-11 East 16th Street

9-11 East 16th Street

Flatiron District/Ladies' Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 7 story, 35,000sf, store and loft building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District. Designed by Louis Korn in a Sullivanesque Style and constructed in 1895 with a limestone, terra-cotta, metal and brick facade.

12 West 17th Street

12 West 17th Street

Chelsea/Ladies' Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 12 story, 32,000sf, store and loft building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District.

Designed by Schwartz & Gross, Architects in a Beaux-Arts Style and constructed in 1911 with a limestone and brick facade above a two-story based edged in a limestone base with a wood and glass storefront.

Board of Standards & Appeals approval.

43 East 19th Street

43 East 19th Street

Fatiron/Ladies' Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of an 8 story, 35,000sf, store and loft building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District.

Designed by Ralph Samuel Townsend, Architect in a Beaux-Arts Style and constructed in 1897 with a limestone facade with a brownstone stucco covering.

Board of Standards & Appeals approval.

106 East 19th Street

106 East 19th Street

Gramercy Park, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 12 story, 35,000sf, store and loft building in the Gramercy Park District. Constructed in 1912 with a limestone facade.

The Gramercy Building

The Gramercy Building

24-6 East 21st Street, Flatiron/Ladies Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 9 story, 45,000sf, store and office building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District. Designed by Frederick C. Zobel, Architect, in a neo-Renaissance Style and constructed in 1903 with a tan brick, limestone and granite facade.

Board of Standards & Appeals approval.

  • 1970s View
10 East 38th Street

10 East 38th Street

Murray Hill, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of a 12 story, 60,000sf, store and loft built. Built in the early part of the 20th century.

11 West 20th Street

11 West 20th Street

Ladies' Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts of 11 West 20th Street, a 9 story, 27,000sf store and loft building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District with a stone facade. Designed by George W. Spitzer, Architect, and constructed in 1901 in a neo-Renaissance style.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

32-34 West 20th Street

32-34 West 20th Street

Ladies' Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of an 11 story, 50,000sf, store and loft building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District. Designed by Frederick C. Zobel, Architect, in a neo-Renaissance Style and constructed in 1906 with a brick and terra-cotta facade.

Conservation of the exterior and renovation of the interior.

Landmarks Preservation Commission and City Planning Commission approval.

Chelsea Flats

Chelsea Flats

126 West 22nd Street, Chelsea, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 12 story, 50,000 s.f. store and loft building in Chelsea. Constructed in 1910 with a limestone and brick facade.

The exterior was conserved and the interior converted to 22 residential lofts including the addition of set back penthouses.

40 West 24th Street

40 West 24th Street

Ladies' Mile, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a ten story, 70,000sf loft building in the Ladies’ Mile Historic District. Designed by Philip Goerlitz, Architect/Owner, in a neo-Renaissance Style and constructed in 1905 with a limestone and brick facade.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

west chelsea / high line district

548 W 22nd Street

548 W 22nd Street

West Chelsea/High Line, Manhattan

Conversion to galleries and residential lofts of an early twentieth century West Chelsea/High Line loft building.

Built as a garage and converted to exhibition space by the DIA Art Foundation. With this exhibition building, the DIA Art Foundation established West Chelsea as an international art center.

Conservation of the exterior, installation of art galleries on the lower floors and creation of a penthouse addition for residential lofts.

flower district

144 West 27th Street

144 West 27th Street

Flower District, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 12 story, 90,000sf, early 20th century store and loft building in the Flower District.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

130 West 28th Street

130 West 28th Street

Flower District, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 7 story, 25,000sf, early 20th century store and loft building in the Flower District.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

garment district

249 West 29th Street

249 West 29th Street

Garment District, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 15 story, 75,000sf, store and loft building in the Garment District. Constructed in the early part of the 20th century in an Art Deco Style.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

252 West 30th Street

252 West 30th Street

Garment District, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 15 story, 75,000sf, store and loft building in the Garment District. Constructed in the early part of the 20th century in an Art Deco Style.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

A.P. Ordway & Co. Building

A.P. Ordway & Co. Building

341-5 West 37th Street, Manhattan

Conservation of the exterior and conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a five story, 45,000sf, manufacturing building in the Garment District. Constructed in 1881 as a chemical building.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

The Wheeler Building
The Wheeler Building, Street View

The Wheeler Building

26-30 West 38th Street, Garment District, Manhattan

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 6 & 12 story, store and loft buildings in the Garment District totaling 75,000sf. Constructed in 1911 in an Art Deco Style.

brooklyn

The Royal Baking Powder Building

The Royal Baking Powder Building

525 Kent Avenue, Williamsburg, Brooklyn

Conversion to residential lofts of a seven story loft building totaling 206,000sf. Constructed in 1920 in an Industrial Style.

Board of Standards and Appeals procedures.

475 Dean Street

475 Dean Street

Brooklyn

Conversion to residential lofts on the upper floors of a 6 story loft buildings totaling 25,000sf. Constructed in 1907 in an Industrial Style.

Board of Standards and Appeals approval.

Upper East Side

660 Madison Avenue

660 Madison Avenue

Upper East Side, Manhattan

Conversion to residential use of the 210,000sf upper twelve stories of 660 Madison Avenue, between East 60th & East 61st Street. 660 Madison was initially constructed in 1958 as the Getty Building for John Paul Getty to the designs of Emery Roth, Architect.

The building is adjacent to the Pierre Hotel to the northwest along East 61st Street and the Metropolitan Club to the west along East 60th Street.
There are unobstructed Central Park views to the west towards Central Park, to the south over East 60st Street, to the east over Madison Avenue and to the north over East 61st Street. The floor to floor heights are 11 feet and numerous setbacks create terraces. As the northernmost premier-quality building in Manhattan, 660 Madison is situated at the nexus of the world-famous Madison Avenue shopping corridor and the beginning of the best of the Upper East Side residential buildings.

The coveted Central Park and city views, the size of the floor plates, the large terraces, the high ceilings and the amenity of the Plaza District combine to make the upper floors of 660 Madison into one of the most ideal residential conversions in the New York City.